Take it to the Crowd

When you have a question about your health or your finances, you go to a doctor or an accountant for advice; you figure they have the knowledge you need to get the answers you’re looking for. But what about when you’re wondering where to go for dinner in a new city? Rather than hiring an expert chef to individually rate each restaurant—a pricey and time-consuming endeavor—you’d probably find it far more practical and efficient to trust the recommendations of the thousands of local diners who’ve already voluntarily rated the restaurants online.

Today, crowdsourcing—in which many individuals work toward the collective goal of narrowing down a large amount of information—has indeed made it easier to choose a good restaurant or pick a movie you’ll likely enjoy. But the concept has also found an application in areas of research where numerous scientists have collected far more data than they could ever analyze on their own.

By taking this data to the crowd, researchers at Caltech have found a way to engage the public while also allowing so-called citizen scientists to investigate a variety of research topics—from very tiny cells on Earth to massive star clusters in our galaxy.

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